Animation Challenge of Drawing Telephone Poles in Perspective

Some of the simplest things in animation turn out to be some of the easiest things to screw up for a new animator. Take drawing scenery for instance, you'd think drawing a straight road to a point, on a perspective would be easy. And yes, that part is. But then drawing some telephone poles and…

Some of the simplest things in animation turn out to be some of the easiest things to screw up for a new animator. Take drawing scenery for instance, you'd think drawing a straight road to a point, on a perspective would be easy. And yes, that part is. But then drawing some telephone poles and considering that each telephone pole needs to be correctly drawn at the right interval must be placed into the sketch-up. Ah ha, but things can get pretty tricky after that.

Throw in a little camber to the road, a couple of ditches on either side, a few fields, some cows, mailboxes every mile, sparsely populated Oak Trees and all of a sudden you've turned one of the easiest things that teach to sixth graders in art class into a complex of challenges. But, let's start with the phones first, and forget about all that other stuff for now. How might we go about this?

Always draw the closest telephone pole first, then the last, then mark off the distances remembering the concept that each sequential space will get smaller between poles. Many animators screw this up by marking off the distinctions in equal depths and then putting in the telephone poles, but this will cause a non-uniform distortion and some human eyes and brains will immediately pick it up as something is wrong there. Please consider all this.

References:

“The Animator's Survival Kit; a Manual of Methods, Principles, and Formulas for Classical, Computer, Games, Stop Motion and Internet Animators” by Richard Williams (director of animation “Who Framed Roger Rabbit”), Published by Faber and Faber, New York; 2001. ISBN: 0-571-21268-9

And

“3D Graphics & Animation; from Starting Up to Standing Out,” by Mark Giambruno; New Riders Publishing; Indianapolis, IN; 1997. ISBN: 1-56205-698-0